AEACGR: Government Funding for Economic Research

Where to Apply
The AEAweb provides information on funding for economists and news on recent funding developments of particular interest to economists. Information on grants for economic research is also available at the AEA’s Resources for Economists Jobs, Grants, Grad School & Advice.

Grants.gov is a central storehouse for information on over 1,000 grant programs and provides access to approximately $500 billion in annual awards. The Department of Health and Human Services is the Grants.gov program’s managing partner, and allows access to the 26 federal grant-making agencies available through this convenient E-Government initiative. All discretionary grants offered by these agencies can be found on Grants.gov. You can go here to find and apply for these grant opportunities.

 

Advice on How to Apply
Postcards from the NSF, by Matthew O. Jackson and Laura Razzolini (a guide to applying for research funding from the NSF).

The National Institutes of Health provide information on New and Early Stage Investigator Policies. The National Institute of Aging Division of Behavioral and Social Research Links to Useful Websitesaddresses questions frequently asked by social scientists.

Research Projects and Research Proposals: A Guide for Scientists Seeking Funding, by Paul G. Chapin (book available from Cambridge University Press)

Important Funding Opportunities
We provide additional information on the government programs that provide the most external funding for academic economic research:

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

  • The Economics Program supports research designed to improve the understanding of the processes and institutions of the U.S. economy and of the world system of which it is a part. This program also strengthens both empirical and theoretical economic analysis as well as the methods for rigorous research on economic behavior. It supports research in almost every area of economics, including econometrics, economic history, environmental economics, finance, industrial organization, international economics, labor economics, macroeconomics, mathematical economics, and public finance.
  • The NSF Economics Program 2009 Status Report describes Economics Program and other NSF funding opportunities as of January, 2010.
  • The Economics Program is alerting economists who do computer intensive research to a new funding opportunity.  The ICES (Interface between Computer Science and Economics and Social Sciences)Program is soliciting research proposals on the boundary between computer science and economics & social sciences.  The next deadline for submitting proposals to ICES is October 5, 2010.  The ICES website provides the full solicitation with all the details about ICES, including a non-exhaustive list of example topics.  The Economics Program can also co-review proposals with ICES.  Contact Nancy Lutz, the Economics Program Director, at nlutz@nsf.gov if you are wondering "Is my project suitable for ICES?" Be sure to include a one or two page description with your email.
  • The Science of Science & Innovation Policy (SciSIP) program supports research designed to advance the scientific basis of science and innovation policy. The program funds research that develops data, models and tools that can be applied in the science and innovation policy decision making process. Researchers are also encouraged to create or improve science and engineering data, metrics and indicators reflecting current discovery, particularly proposals that demonstrate the viability of collecting and analyzing data on knowledge generation and innovation in organizations. The research of economists funded by the SciSIP program can be found here.
  • The Decision, Risk and Management Sciences program supports scientific research directed at increasing the understanding and effectiveness of decision making by individuals, groups, organizations, and society. Disciplinary and interdisciplinary research, doctoral dissertation research, and workshops are funded in the areas of judgment and decision making; decision analysis and decision aids; risk analysis, perception, and communication; societal and public policy decision making; management science and organizational design.
  • The Division of Science Resources Statistics (SRS) fulfills the legislative mandate of the National Science Foundation Act to provide a central clearinghouse for the collection, interpretation, and analysis of data on scientific and engineering resources, and to provide a source of information for policy formulation by other agencies of the Federal Government. To carry out this mandate, SRS designs, supports, and directs about 11 periodic surveys as well as a variety of other data collections and research projects. In addition to the SRS surveys, designed and managed by SRS staff and conducted primarily by contractors or the Bureau of the Census, the Division also supports a small program of extramural research on both methodological and substantive areas related to the work of SRS. The Division also supports several programs that encourage the training and development of additional researchers to analyze SRS data, through training workshops, small grants, and fellows programs.
  • The Methodology, Measurement, and Statistics (MMS) Program is an interdisciplinary program in the Social, Behavioral, and Economic Sciences that supports the development of innovative analytical and statistical methods and models for those sciences. MMS seeks proposals that are methodologically innovative, grounded in theory, and have potential utility for multiple fields within the social and behavioral sciences. As part of its larger portfolio, the MMS Program partners with a consortium of federal statistical agencies to support research proposals that further the development of new and innovative approaches to surveys and to the analysis of survey data.

NATONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH

  • The Division of Behavioral and Social Research (BSR) in the National Institute of Aging supports basic social and behavioral research and research training on the processes of aging at both the individual and societal level. It focuses on how people change over the adult life course and on the societal impact of the changing age-composition of the population. BSR fosters research that reaches across disciplinary boundaries, at multiple levels from the genetic to comparisons across national boundaries, and at stages from basic through translational.
  • The Demographic and Behavioral Sciences (DBS) Branch in the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development funds demographic, behavioral, and social sciences research on fertility, families, population movement, morbidity and mortality, HIV/AIDS, and population composition. Research on population diversity and change, studies of the consequences of population diversity and change for health and well-being, and research on the interrelationships among individual, family, group, community, and population processes are all central to this mission.

OTHER FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES

  • Economics of Prevention (R21):  This FOA solicits R21 applications for research to conduct economic analyses of prevention and health. Applications must be responsive to one of four topic areas that target research that addresses costs of health care, benefits to the health care system and other sectors of the economy and cost-effectiveness all within the context of prevention and health.
    Mechanism of Support. This FOA will utilize the Exploratory/Developmental
    (R21) award mechanism.
    Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards. Approximately $1.2M has been set aside to fund approximately 6 research grants, contingent upon receiving scientifically meritorious proposals.
    Budget and Project Period. Budget requests must conform to the existing limits of the R21 research grant mechanism (Budgets for direct costs of up to $200,000 per year and a project period of up to two years may be requested for a maximum of $275,000 direct costs over a two-year project period).
    The deadline for submitting applications is October 26, 2010 with Letters of Intent due by September 28, 2010.  See instructions in the RFA-RM-10-016.
    Send questions to V. Jeffery Evans at Jeff_Evans@Nih.gov.
  • Science of Structure, Organization and Practice Design in the Efficient Delivery of Effective Healthcare (R21): This FOA solicits R21 applications for exploratory and developmental research projects that will lead to increased efficiency in the production of health and delivery of health care. Specifically, research sought under this announcement should inform 1) the identification of specific, modifiable causes of high and increasing health care costs related to the structure, organization, and production of health care; and 2) the development and refinement of interventions, practices, or policies that can address these causes while maintaining or enhancing outcomes.
    Mechanism of Support. This FOA will utilize the Exploratory/Developmental
    (R21) award mechanism.
    Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards. Approximately $1.2 million will be available for this FOA in 2011. NIH anticipates making approximately 6 awards in 2011, contingent upon receiving scientifically meritorious proposals. Because the nature and scope of the proposed research will vary from application to application, it is anticipated that the size and duration of each award may also vary. The total amount awarded and the number of awards will depend on the quality, duration, and costs, of the applications received.
    Budget and Project Period. Budgets for the direct cost of up to $200,000 in any single year and a project duration of up to two years may be requested for a maximum of $275,000 direct costs over the two-year project period The deadline for submitting applications is October 26, 2010 with Letters of Intent due by September 28, 2010.  See instructions in the
    RFA-RM-10-016.
    Send questions to John G. Haaga at HaagaJ@mail.nih.gov.
  • Regional and International Differences in Health and Longevity at Older Ages (R01):
    This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) issued by the National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, solicits small-scale Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/ organizations proposing to advance knowledge on the reasons behind the divergent trends that have been observed in health and longevity at older ages, both across industrialized/high life expectancy nations and across geographical areas in the United States.  This FOA is intended to capitalize on provocative findings in the literature which have gone unexplained to date.  This FOA is also intended to capitalize on NIA’s investment in the development of cross-nationally comparable datasets that can be harnessed to study these research questions; these include the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), the English Longitudinal Study on Ageing (ELSA), and the Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (SHARE).  Applications proposing secondary analysis, new data collection, calibration of measures across studies, development of innovative survey measures, and linkages to administrative sources are encouraged.  Applications are not restricted to projects using the NIA-supported datasets above and may propose research using any relevant data.
    Mechanism of Support. This FOA will utilize the R01 award mechanism.
    Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards. National Institute on Aging intends to commit $7,500,000 in total costs over the project period for use under this FOA. We anticipate that 3-5 awards will be made for Fiscal Year 2011, pending the number and quality of applications and availability of funds.
    Budget and Project Period. Direct costs are expected to range between $200,000 and $333,000 per year.  Direct costs are limited to $333,000 in FY 2011.  The total project period for an application submitted in response to this funding opportunity may not exceed five years.
    The deadline for submitting applications is October 14, 2010 with Letters of Intent due by September 14, 2010.  See instructions in the RFA.
    Send questions to Georgeanne E. Patmios at patmiosg@nia.nih.gov.
  • Subjective Well-being: Advances in Measurement and Applications to Aging (R01):
    This NIH Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) issued by the National Institute on Aging and the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine, solicits Research Project Grant (R01) applications from institutions/organizations that propose to advance the application of well-being measurement to the integrated study of experienced and evaluative well-being in aging-relevant contexts.  This FOA is intended to capitalize on recent advances in (a) approaches to measurement of both experienced well-being (e.g. reports of momentary positive and rewarding, or negative and distressing states) and evaluative well-being (e.g., cognitive judgments of overall life satisfaction or dissatisfaction); (b) understanding of psychological changes associated with aging that might impact these experiences and evaluations; and (c) global interest in well-being measurement as a critical index of the success or failure of economic, social and health policies.   This FOA solicits applications
    from interdisciplinary teams including behavioral scientists, psychologists, sociologists, biomedical researchers, economists and population scientists to explore which aspects of experienced and evaluative well-being, time use, and context promote or impede healthy aging; to enhance measurement of these factors in both laboratory and survey environments; and to identify modifiable factors in individuals or societies that might be potential targets for intervention.
    Mechanism of Support. This FOA will utilize the R01 award mechanism.
    Funds Available and Anticipated Number of Awards. The National Institute on Aging intends to commit $5,000,000 in total costs over the project period for use under this FOA. In addition, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine intends to commit $1,000,000 in total costs over the project period to support projects that are relevant to NCCAM’s mission. We anticipate that 3-6 awards will be made for Fiscal Year 2011, pending the number and quality of applications and availability of funds. For this funding opportunity, budgets up to  $350,000 directed costs per year and time periods up to five years may be requested.
    Budget and Project Period. The annual direct cost amount for individual awards is expected to range from $150,000 to $350,000, for projects up to five years in duration.
    The deadline for submitting applications is November 3, 2010 with Letters of Intent due by October 3, 2010.
    See the instructions in the RFA.
    Send questions to Lis Nielsen at nielsenli@nia.nih.gov.
  • Basic Behavioral and Social Sciences Research Opportunity Network (OppNet)
    OppNet is a trans-NIH initiative that funds activities that build the collective body of knowledge about the nature of behavior and social systems, and that deepen our understanding of basic mechanisms of behavioral and social processes.  All 24 NIH Institutes and Centers that fund research and four Program Offices within the NIH Office of the Director (ICOs) co-fund and co-manage OppNet.  All OppNet initiatives invite investigators to propose innovative research that will advance a targeted domain of basic social and behavioral sciences and produce knowledge and/or tools of potential relevance to multiple domains of health- and lifecourse-related research.  See the OppNet website for more information about OppNet and all its funding opportunities.
    OppNet intends to commit up to $1 million in FY 2011 to fund 5-6 applications submitted in response FOAs (RFA-HD-11-101) and (RFA-HD-11-102) that are designed to stimulate research that will investigate the biopsychosocial mechanisms underlying the reciprocal and dynamic relationships between behavioral and social environment factors on the one hand and basic sleep and circadian regulation and function on the other.
    Two broad categories of proposals are responsive to this initiative: 1. Human or animal studies of the biological sequelae of changes in basic behavioral patterns of sleep duration and timing as a function of determinants from the social environment; 2. Human or animal studies of the dynamic relationships of individuals' behaviors in social interactions as a function of sleep or circadian rhythms. For more information on the FOA see the National Institutes of Health grant website. Letters of Intent are due on September 8, 2010. Applications are due on October 8, 2010.

     

2011 NIH Director's Award Programs:

Transformative Research Projects Award Program Announcing funding for Transformative Research Projects (T-R01) Award Program:

  • Exceptionally innovative, high risk, original and/or unconventional research
  • Clinical, basic, and/or behavioral/social science research projects
  • Up to $25 million total costs per year for a single project
  • One-third of total funding budget geared to projects with more than $1 Million in direct costs.

The deadline for submitting Transformative Research Project applications is October 27, 2010 with Letters of Intent due by September 27, 2010.  See the instructions in the RFA (RFA-RM-10-010).  Additional information, including Frequently Asked Questions about the Transformative Research Projects Program is available here. Send questions toT_R01@mail.nih.gov.

Pioneer Awards and New Innovator Awards for innovative approaches to major challenges in biomedical or behavioral research.

Pioneer Awards:

  • Up to $2.5 million in direct costs over 5 years
  • Open to scientists at any career stage.

New Innovator Awards:

  • Up to $1.5 million in direct costs over 5 years
  • For early stage investigators (ESI), defined as those who have not received an NIH R01 or similar grant and are within 10 years of completing their terminal research degree or medical residency. NIH expects to make at least 7 Pioneer Awards and at least 33 New Innovator Awards in summer 2011.

The deadline for submitting Pioneer Award applications is September 13, 2010. See the instructions in the RFA (RFA-RM-10-008) and the NIH Pioneer Program page for more information. Send questions to pioneer@nih.gov.

The deadline for submitting New Innovator Award applications is September 20, 2010. See the instructions in the RFA (RFA-RM-10-009) and the New Innovator Award page for more information. Send questions to newinnovator@nih.gov.

The NIH Common Fund (formerly the NIH Roadmap) encourages collaboration and supports a series of exceptionally high impact, trans-NIH programs. These programs are supported by the Common Fund, and managed by the NIH Office of the Director in partnership with the various NIH Institutes, Centers and Offices. Additional information about the NIH Common Fund can be found here