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Mar 28 -- The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) invites comments to OMB by April 28, 2022 regarding its proposed Mental and Substance Use Disorders Prevalence Study (MDPS).

SAMHSA is requesting from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) approval to conduct recruitment activities and clinical interviews with household respondents and non-household facilities and respondents as part of the Mental and Substance Use Disorders Prevalence Study (MDPS) pilot program. Activities conducted will include: A household rostering and mental health screening of household participants and a clinical interview of both household and non-household participants. The information gathered by the clinical interview will be used to determine prevalence estimates of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use disorders among U.S. adults ages 18 to 65 years.

The primary objective of the MDPS pilot program is to examine methods to estimate the prevalence of specific mental illnesses, particularly adults with psychotic disorders and serious functional impairment, and treatment in both populations to answer two core research questions:

What is the prevalence of schizophrenia/schizoaffective disorder (lifetime and past year), bipolar I disorder (past year), major depressive disorder (past year), generalized anxiety disorder (past year), posttraumatic stress disorder (past year), obsessive-compulsive disorder (past year), anorexia nervosa (past year), and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use disorders (past year) among adults, ages 18-65, in the United States?
What proportion of adults in the United States with these disorders received treatment in the past year?

In addition to these research questions, the MDPS pilot program will allow for procedural evaluation to:

Identify which set of screening instruments might be best to accurately identify mental and substance use disorders within the U.S. household population;
Understand the best approaches to conducting data collection within non-household settings, to gather information on mental illness and treatment;
Design protocols for collecting clinical interviews from proxy respondents; and
Establish a protocol that can be used at a larger scale to understand the prevalence and burden of specific mental disorders in both non-household and household populations across the United States.

Household Rostering

The household rostering includes inquiries about all adults ages 18 and older residing in the household, to assess eligibility for inclusion in the study, and then selecting up to two adults for the household mental health screening. The total number of household members and numbers of adults and children are first asked, followed by the first name, age and sex of all adult household members, as well as whether any adult in the household has had a serious medical condition. The best time to be interviewed is collected as well. The computerized roster can be completed online, by phone, on paper, or in-person. The target population is adults ages 18-65 residing in U.S. households; it is estimated that 45,000 household rosters will be completed. The primary objective of the household roster is to select up to two age-eligible participants for the mental health screening interview.

Household Mental Health Screening

The household mental health screening interview utilizes the Computerized Adaptive Testing for Mental Health Disorders (CAT-MH) or the World Health Organization's Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) instruments to assess symptoms related to the mental health and substance use disorders of interest, including schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use. The screening instrument also includes questions on treatment, receipt of Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), military experience, and exposure to and impact of COVID-19. The computerized mental health screening can be completed online, by phone, on paper or in-person. The primary objectives of the household mental health screening interview are to assess the symptoms endorsed and determine eligibility and selection for the MDPS pilot program clinical interview.

Clinical Interview

The MDPS pilot program clinical interview includes questions that assess the mental health and substance use disorders using the NetSCID, a computerized version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-V (SCID). This instrument includes questions on symptoms and their duration and frequency for the disorders of interest. Also collected from respondents is demographic information, including sex, gender, age, education and employment status. Hospitalization and treatment history are asked as well as questions to assess exposure to COVID-19 of self or other close family members and the impact on mental health. Up to two adults per household will be selected to complete the clinical interview. Participants from the prisons, jails, homeless shelters and state psychiatric hospitals will complete the clinical interview as well. The computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) is administered by a trained clinical interviewer, and can be conducted by video conference, such as Zoom or WebEx, phone or in person. Approximately 7,200 clinical interviews will be conducted as part of the MDPS pilot program. The primary objective of the clinical interview is to estimate the prevalence of the disorders of interest, including schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use, as well as unmet treatment needs.

Jail Mental Health Screening

The jail mental health screening interview utilizes the CIDI screening instruments to assess symptoms related to the primary mental health and substance use disorders of interest including schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder; bipolar I disorder; major depressive disorder; generalized anxiety disorder; posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); obsessive-compulsive disorder; anorexia nervosa; and alcohol, benzodiazepine, opioid, stimulant, and cannabis use. The screening instrument also includes questions on treatment, receipt of Social Security Disability Income (SSDI), military experience, and exposure to and impact of COVID-19. The computerized mental health screening will be completed in person or by phone. The target population is a convenience sample of incarcerated 18-65-year-old adults, in up to six jails identified by the MDPS co-investigator team. Up to 208 mental health screening interviews will be conducted among incarcerated respondents. Respondents will be provided with a card that includes contact information and asked to contact the project personnel when they are released for inclusion in the household clinical interview sample. The primary objective of the jail mental health screening interview is to determine the feasibility of conducting mental health screening interviews within a jail population, as well as whether they would have been included in the household sample during the data collection period should they not have been incarcerated.

Facility Recruitment

Information packets will be sent to all selected prisons, state psychiatric hospitals, homeless shelters and jails including a letter of invitation, letters of support, an overview of the project and an overview of the data collection process in the facility. Facilities will be contacted by telephone, to answer any questions and provide additional information regarding the MDPS pilot program. Once approval is obtained, a logistics manager will contact the facility to provide instructions on the rostering and selection processes, to schedule the data collection visit, and to determine the appropriate space to conduct the interviews and the number of days and hours per day for data collection. Facilities will be asked to provide a roster (deidentified or identified) of eligible residents within one week of scheduling the data collection visit and again one-to-two weeks prior to the actual data collection visit (note: Data collection can be scheduled up to 4 months in advance). At the time of data collection, facility staff will assist with data collection activities including escorting selected inmates to and from the data collection area.
 
2020 MDPS grant announcement: https://www.samhsa.gov/grants/grant-announcements/fg-19-003
MDPS submission to OMB: https://www.reginfo.gov/public/do/PRAViewICR?ref_nbr=202203-0930-004 Click IC List for forms, View Supporting Statement for technical documentation. Submit comments through this site.
FR notice: https://www.federalregister.gov/d/2022-06414
 
For AEA members wishing to submit comments to OMB, the AEA Committee on Economic Statistics offers "A Primer on How to Respond to Calls for Comment on Federal Data Collections" at https://www.aeaweb.org/content/file?id=5806

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