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H.R. 3684 TITLE IV—ENABLING ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT AND DATA COLLECTION
Subtitle B—Energy Information Administration

Sec. 40411. Definitions.
Sec. 40412. Data collection in the electricity sector.
Sec. 40413. Expansion of energy consumption surveys.
Sec. 40414. Data collection on electric vehicle integration with the electricity grids.
Sec. 40415. Plan for the modeling and forecasting of demand for minerals used in the energy sector.
Sec. 40416. Expansion of international energy data.
Sec. 40417. Plan for the National Energy Modeling System.
Sec. 40418. Report on costs of carbon abatement in the electricity sector.
Sec. 40419. Harmonization of efforts and data.
 
For text, see: https://www.dropbox.com/s/9edtufjhwp3md60/EIA%20infrastructure%20bill%20provisions.pdf?dl=0
 
Excerpts:
 
SEC. 40412. Data collection in the electricity sector.
(a) Dashboard.—
(1) ESTABLISHMENT.—
(A) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall establish an online database to track the operation of the bulk power system in the contiguous 48 States (referred to in this section as the “Dashboard”).
(B) IMPROVEMENT OF EXISTING DASHBOARD.—The Dashboard may be established through the improvement, in accordance with this subsection, of an existing dashboard of the Energy Information Administration, such as—
(i) the U.S. Electric System Operating Data dashboard; or
(ii) the Hourly Electric Grid Monitor.
(2) EXPANSION.—
(A) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall expand the Dashboard to include, to the maximum extent practicable, hourly operating data collected from the electricity balancing authorities that operate the bulk power system in all of the several States, each territory of the United States, and the District of Columbia.  
(B) TYPES OF DATA.—The hourly operating data collected under subparagraph (A) may include data relating to . . .  
 
(b) Mix of energy sources.—
(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall establish, in accordance with section 40419 and this subsection and to the extent the Administrator determines to be appropriate, a system to harmonize the operating data on electricity generation collected under subsection (a) with—
(A) measurements of greenhouse gas and other pollutant emissions collected by the Environmental Protection Agency;
(B) other data collected by the Environmental Protection Agency or other relevant Federal agencies, as the Administrator determines to be appropriate; and
(C) data collected by State or regional energy credit registries.
(2) OUTCOMES.—The system established under paragraph (1) shall result in an integrated dataset that includes, for any given time—
(A) the net generation of electricity by megawatt hour within the metered boundaries of each balancing authority; and
(B) where available, the average and marginal greenhouse gas emissions by megawatt hour of electricity generated within the metered boundaries of each balancing authority.
(3) REAL-TIME DATA DISSEMINATION.—To the maximum extent practicable, the system established under paragraph (1) shall disseminate data—
(A) on a real-time basis; and
(B) through an application programming interface that is publicly accessible. . . .

(c) Observed characteristics of bulk power system resource integration.—
(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall establish a system to provide to the public timely data on the integration of energy resources into the bulk power system and the electric distribution grids in the United States, and the observed effects of that integration.
(2) REQUIREMENTS.—In carrying out paragraph (1), the Administrator shall seek to improve the temporal and spatial resolution of data relating to how grid operations are changing, such as through . . .
 
(d) Distribution system operations.—
(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall establish a system to provide to the public timely data on the operations of load-serving entities in the electricity grids of the United States. . . .

SEC. 40413. Expansion of energy consumption surveys.
(a) In general.—Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall implement measures to expand the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey, the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey, and the Residential Energy Consumption Survey to include data on energy end use in order to facilitate the identification of—
(1) opportunities to improve energy efficiency and energy productivity;
(2) changing patterns of energy use; and
(3) opportunities to better understand and manage miscellaneous electric loads.

(b) Requirements.—
(1) IN GENERAL.—In carrying out subsection (a), the Administrator shall—
(A) increase the scope and frequency of data collection on energy end uses and services;
(B) use new data collection methods and tools in order to obtain more comprehensive data and reduce the burden on survey respondents, including by—
(i) accessing other existing data sources; and
(ii) if feasible, developing online and real-time reporting systems;
(C) identify and report community-level economic and environmental impacts, including with respect to . . .
 
SEC. 40414. Data collection on electric vehicle integration with the electricity grids.
(a) In general.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall develop and implement measures to expand data collection with respect to electric vehicle integration with the electricity grids. . . .

SEC. 40415. Plan for the modeling and forecasting of demand for minerals used in the energy sector.
(a) Plan.—
(1) IN GENERAL.—Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator, in coordination with the Director of the United States Geological Survey, shall develop a plan for the modeling and forecasting of demand for energy technologies, including for energy production, transmission, or storage purposes, that use minerals that are or could be designated as critical minerals.
  
SEC. 40416. Expansion of international energy data.
(a) In general.—Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall implement measures to expand and improve the international energy data resources of the Energy Information Administration in order to understand—
(1) the production and use of energy in various countries;
(2) changing patterns of energy use internationally;
(3) the relative costs and environmental impacts of energy production and use internationally; and
(4) plans for or construction of major energy facilities or infrastructure.
 
SEC. 40417. Plan for the National Energy Modeling System.
Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall develop a plan to identify any need or opportunity to update or further the capabilities of the National Energy Modeling System, including with respect to—
(1) treating energy demand endogenously;
(2) increased natural gas usage and increased market penetration of renewable energy;
(3) flexible operating modes of nuclear power plants, such as load following and frequency control;
(4) tools to model multiple-output energy systems that provide hydrogen, high-value heat, electricity, and chemical synthesis services, including interactions of those energy systems with the electricity grids, pipeline networks, and the broader economy;
(5) demand response and improved representation of energy storage, including long-duration storage, in capacity expansion models;
(6) electrification, particularly with respect to the transportation, industrial, and buildings sectors;
(7) increasing model resolution to represent all hours of the year and all electricity generators;
(8) wholesale electricity market design and the appropriate valuation of all services that support the reliability of electricity grids, such as—
(A) battery storage; and
(B) synthetic inertia from grid-tied inverters;
(9) economic modeling of the role of energy efficiency, demand response, electricity storage, and a variety of distributed generation technologies;
(10) the production, transport, use, and storage of carbon dioxide, hydrogen, and hydrogen carriers;
(11) greater flexibility in—
(A) the modeling of the environmental impacts of electricity systems, such as—
(i) emissions of greenhouse gases and other pollutants; and
(ii) the use of land and water resources; and
(B) the ability to support climate modeling, such as the climate modeling performed by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research in the Office of Science of the Department;
(12) technologies that are in an early stage of commercial deployment and have been identified by the Secretary as candidates for large-scale demonstration projects, such as--
(A) carbon capture, transport, use, and storage from any source or economic sector;
(B) direct air capture; . . .
(13) increased and improved data sources and tools, including—
(A) the establishment of technology and cost baselines, including technology learning rates;
(B) economic and employment impacts of energy system policies and energy prices on households, as a function of household income and region; and
(C) the use of behavioral economics to inform demand modeling in all sectors; and
(14) striving to migrate toward a single, consistent, and open-source modeling platform, and increasing open access to model systems, data, and outcomes, for—
(A) disseminating reference scenarios that can be transparently and broadly replicated; and
(B) promoting the development of the researcher and analyst workforce needed to continue the development and validation of improved energy system models in the future.

SEC. 40418. Report on costs of carbon abatement in the electricity sector.
Not later than 270 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Administrator shall submit to Congress a report on—
(1) the potential use of levelized cost of carbon abatement or a similar metric in analyzing generators of electricity, including an identification of limitations and appropriate uses of the metric;
(2) the feasibility and impact of incorporating levelized cost of carbon abatement in long-term forecasts— . . .
(3) (A) a potential process to measure carbon dioxide emissions intensity per unit of output production for a range of—
(i) energy sources;
(ii) sectors; and
(iii) geographic regions; and
(B) a corresponding process to provide an empirical framework for reporting the status and costs of carbon dioxide reduction relative to specified goals.

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