Congratulations to Janet Yellen


Janet Yellen Congratulations to Janet Yellen who is now confirmed as the next Federal Reserve Chair!

A 2012 AEA Distinguished Fellow and former Vice President of the Association, Ms. Yellen's long-standing influence on the economics profession is demonstrated by her participation in various AEA activities including the following research in AEA journals. The American Economic Association is providing complimentary access to all articles.

AER (American Economic Review)

Akerlof, George A., and Janet L. Yellen. 1985. "Can Small Deviations from Rationality Make Significant Differences to Economic Equilibria?" American Economic Review 75 (4): 708-20.
[Full-text Article]

Akerlof, George A., and Janet L. Yellen. 1987. "Rational Models of Irrational Behavior." American Economic Review 77 (2): 137-42.
[Full-text article]

Akerlof, George A., and Janet L. Yellen. 1988. "Fairness and Unemployment." American Economic Review 78 (2): 44-49.
[Full-text article]

Feldstein, Martin, Mervyn King, and Janet L. Yellen. 2004. "Innovations and Issues in Monetary Policy: Panel Discussion." American Economic Review 94 (2): 41-48.
[Full-text article]

Yellen, Janet L. 1980. "On Keynesian Economics and the Economics of the Post-Keynesians." American Economic Review 70 (2): 15-25.
[Full-text article]

Yellen, Janet L. 1984. "Efficiency Wage Models of Unemployment." American Economic Review 74 (2): 200-205.
[Full-text article]

JEP (Journal of Economic Perspectives)

Yellen, Janet L. 1989. "Symposium on the Budget Deficit." Journal of Economic Perspectives 3 (2): 17-21.
[Full-text article]



Contents of Current Issues

Summer 2015 JEP

August 2015 AEJ: Policy

August 2015 AEJ: Micro

July 2015 AEJ: Macro

July 2015 AER

July 2015 AEJ: Applied

June 2015 JEL

Virtual Field Journals

In the News:

FiveThirtyEight covered the ongoing debate over teacher evaluation, citing two companion papers that appeared together in the September 2014 issue of the American Economic Review. In "Measuring the Impacts of Teachers" I and II the authors construct "value-added" estimates for teachers in a large urban school district by observing how students' test scores change from year to year as they pass through each teacher's classroom. They find that their teacher value-added scores are not significantly biased and are potent predictors of students' later-life outcomes.

The Washington Post's Monkey Cage blog cited work by Dani Rodrik, including an article appearing in the Journal of Economic Perspectives last year. In When Ideas Trump Interests: Preferences, Worldviews, and Policy Innovations, Rodrik argues that "policy entrepreneurship" – the creation and spread of new public policy ideas in the political marketplace – should be taken more seriously by economists.

Wonkblog covered an article published this month in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics. In Saving Lives at Birth: The Impact of Home Births on Infant Outcomes the authors study a sample of over 300,000 Dutch women and find that home birth increases the risk of newborn mortality, especially for low-income women, likely because of reduced access to medical technologies after delivery.

A Wall Street Journal analysis of potential merger activity in the health insurance industry cited a study published in the American Economic Review. In "Paying a Premium on Your Premium? Consolidation in the US Health Insurance Industry," the authors found that a 1999 merger between two large U.S. health insurers drove up customer premiums and depressed doctors' earnings in certain parts of the country.

AEA in News Archive

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