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Intersectionality of Labor Rights and Gender Inequality

Paper Session

Saturday, Jan. 4, 2020 10:15 AM - 12:15 PM (PST)

Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor F
Hosted By: Labor and Employment Relations Association
  • Chair: Bill Spriggs, Howard University

Labor Union Representation of Women in Non-standard Forms of Work: The Intersection of Gender and Worker Voice Across Advanced Economies

Chloe Touzet
,
OECD
Sandrine Cazes
,
OECD

Abstract

This paper examines gaps in wages and job quality faced by women in non-standard jobs, it considers whether and how collective bargaining and union representation could help close these gaps, and it discusses the barriers to union representation of workers in non-standard forms of work across the full range of union density and labor market institutions in advanced economies. The gaps in representation are fairly constant in low and high union density countries. The particular challenges attached to union representation of women in non-standard work are reviewed.

Gender Job Segregation, Labor Regulation and the Labor Share of Income

Elissa Braunstein
,
Colorado State University
Stephanie Seguino
,
University of Vermont

Abstract

This paper looks at the role of gender job segregation and inequality through the effect of gender job segregation on labor's share of national income. An earlier paper found this relationship was true in both advanced and emerging market nations. Further, among advanced economies, it was found that weakening protections for dismissal increased women's job segregation, which then lowered labor's share of income. This paper focuses on advanced economies and digs deeper on regulations that protect dismissal to include the role of unions in protecting workers. So, this includes an analysis of type of collective bargaining - centralized, decentralized, sectoral - and union density to also examine those effects.

Wrongful Discharge, Union Representation and Women's Wages: A Cross-State Analysis

Eric Hoyt
,
University of Massachusetts-Amherst

Abstract

This paper builds on a previous work that re-examined work on the effects of wrongful discharge regulations, laws and court rulings. In that paper, it was found using cross state variation in court cases on wrongful discharge, there was a significant positive effect on women's wages when wrongful discharge cases changed the at-will nature of employment in a state. This paper extends that analysis to look at the role of labor unions, who also protect workers against wrongful discharge in boosting women's wages.
Discussant(s)
Jeannette Wicks-Lim
,
University of Massachusetts-Amherst
Jevay Grooms
,
Howard University
JEL Classifications
  • J1 - Demographic Economics