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2005. "Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession." American Economic Review, 95(2): 509-518.

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In the News:

A recent study on the relationship between new roads and traffic from the American Economic Review was cited in The Atlantic. In The Fundamental Law of Road Congestion: Evidence from US Cities, authors Gilles Duration and Matthew Turner find that new lanes on interstate highways and other major roads are quickly filled with new cars and trucks and do not tend to reduce congestion. They conclude that congestion pricing, rather than roadway construction, is the most promising tool for combating persistent traffic.

Three articles on the future of automation and labor markets from last month's Journal of Economic Perspectives symposium were featured on the Free Exchange Blog in the Economist.

The Economist highlighted a new paper in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics about peer effects on high school students. In The Girl Next Door: The Effect of Opposite Gender Friends on High School Achievement, author Andrew Hill takes advantage of the fact that some students happen to live in neighborhoods with more schoolmates of the opposite gender. He finds that having a higher share of opposite-gender friends lowers a student's GPA across a range of subjects.

FiveThirtyEight covered the ongoing debate over teacher evaluation, citing two companion papers that appeared together in the September 2014 issue of the American Economic Review. In "Measuring the Impacts of Teachers" I and II the authors construct "value-added" estimates for teachers in a large urban school district by observing how students' test scores change from year to year as they pass through each teacher's classroom. They find that their teacher value-added scores are not significantly biased and are potent predictors of students' later-life outcomes.

The Washington Post's Monkey Cage blog cited work by Dani Rodrik, including an article appearing in the Journal of Economic Perspectives last year. In When Ideas Trump Interests: Preferences, Worldviews, and Policy Innovations, Rodrik argues that "policy entrepreneurship" – the creation and spread of new public policy ideas in the political marketplace – should be taken more seriously by economists.

Wonkblog covered an article published this month in the American Economic Journal: Applied Economics. In Saving Lives at Birth: The Impact of Home Births on Infant Outcomes the authors study a sample of over 300,000 Dutch women and find that home birth increases the risk of newborn mortality, especially for low-income women, likely because of reduced access to medical technologies after delivery.

A Wall Street Journal analysis of potential merger activity in the health insurance industry cited a study published in the American Economic Review. In "Paying a Premium on Your Premium? Consolidation in the US Health Insurance Industry," the authors found that a 1999 merger between two large U.S. health insurers drove up customer premiums and depressed doctors' earnings in certain parts of the country.

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