This setting lets you change the way you view articles. You can choose to have articles open in a dialog window, a new tab, or directly in the same window.
Open in Dialog
Open in New Tab
Open in same window

American Economic Journal: Applied Economics: Vol. 2 No. 2 (April 2010)

Expand

Quick Tools:

Print Article Summary
Export Citation
Sign up for Email Alerts Follow us on Twitter Subscription Information
(Institutional Administrator Access)

Explore:

AEJ: Applied - All Issues

AEJ: Applied Forthcoming Articles

An Empirical Analysis of the Gender Gap in Mathematics

Article Citation

Fryer, Roland G., and Steven D. Levitt. 2010. "An Empirical Analysis of the Gender Gap in Mathematics." American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 2(2): 210-40.

DOI: 10.1257/app.2.2.210

Abstract

We document and analyze the emergence of a substantial gender gap in mathematics in the early years of schooling using a large, recent, and nationally representative panel of US children. There are no mean differences between boys and girls upon entry to school, but girls lose more than two-tenths of a standard deviation relative to boys over the first six years of school. The ground lost by girls relative to boys is roughly half as large as the black-white test score gap that appears over these same ages. We document the presence of this gender math gap across every strata of society. We explore a wide range of possible explanations in the data, including less investment by girls in math, low parental expectations, and biased tests, but find little support for these theories. Moving to cross-country comparisons, we find earlier results linking the gender gap in math to measures of gender equality are sensitive to the inclusion of Muslim countries, where, in spite of women's low status, there is little or no gender gap in math. (JEL I23, J26)

Article Full-Text Access

Full-text Article

Additional Materials

Download Data Set (210.36 KB)

Authors

Fryer, Roland G. (Harvard U)
Levitt, Steven D. (U Chicago)

JEL Classifications

I23: Higher Education and Research Institutions
J26: Retirement; Retirement Policies

Comments

View Comments on This Article (0) | Login to post a comment


American Economic Journal: Applied Economics


Quick Tools:

Sign up for Email Alerts

Follow us on Twitter

Subscription Information
(Institutional Administrator Access)

Explore:

AEJ: Applied - All Issues

AEJ: Applied - Forthcoming Articles

Virtual Field Journals


AEA Member Login:


AEAweb | AEA Journals | Contact Us