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American Economic Journal: Applied Economics: Vol. 1 No. 1 (January 2009)

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Many Children Left Behind? Textbooks and Test Scores in Kenya

Article Citation

Glewwe, Paul, Michael Kremer, and Sylvie Moulin. 2009. "Many Children Left Behind? Textbooks and Test Scores in Kenya." American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 1(1): 112-35.

DOI: 10.1257/app.1.1.112

Abstract

A randomized evaluation in rural Kenya finds, contrary to the previous literature, that providing textbooks did not raise average test scores. Textbooks did increase the scores of the best students (those with high pretest scores) but had little effect on other students. Textbooks are written in English, most students' third language, and many students could not use them effectively. More generally, the curriculum in Kenya, and in many other developing countries, tends to be oriented toward academically strong students, leaving many students behind in societies that combine a centralized educational system; the heterogeneity in student preparation associated with rapid educational expansion; and disproportionate elite power. (JEL O15, I21, I28, J13)

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Authors

Glewwe, Paul (U MN, St Paul)
Kremer, Michael (Harvard U and Center for Global Development)
Moulin, Sylvie (Rabat American School)

JEL Classifications

I21: Analysis of Education
I28: Education: Government Policy
J13: Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
O15: Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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