This setting lets you change the way you view articles. You can choose to have articles open in a dialog window, a new tab, or directly in the same window.
Open in Dialog
Open in New Tab
Open in same window

American Economic Review: Vol. 89 No. 4 (September 1999)

Expand

Quick Tools:

Print Article Summary
Export Citation
Sign up for Email Alerts Follow us on Twitter

Explore:

AER - All Issues

AER Forthcoming Articles

Does Where You Stand Depend on Where You Sit? Tithing Donations and Self-Serving Beliefs

Article Citation

Dahl, Gordon B., and Michael R. Ransom. 1999. "Does Where You Stand Depend on Where You Sit? Tithing Donations and Self-Serving Beliefs." American Economic Review, 89(4): 703-727.

DOI: 10.1257/aer.89.4.703

Abstract

Economists and psychologists argue that individuals skew personal beliefs to accord with their own interests. To test for the presence of self-serving beliefs, we surveyed 1,200 members of the Mormon Church about tithing. A tithe is a voluntary contribution equal to 10 percent of income. Since respondents must decide privately what income items to tithe, we observe how the income definition depends on an individual's religious and financial incentives. We find surprisingly little evidence that an individual's financial situation influences beliefs about what counts as income for the tithe. However, ambiguity increases the role for self-serving biases.

Article Full-Text Access

Full-text Article

Authors

Dahl, Gordon B. (U Rochester)
Ransom, Michael R. (Brigham Young U)

JEL Classifications

D64: Altruism
Z12: Cultural Economics: Religion


American Economic Review


Quick Tools:

Sign up for Email Alerts

Follow us on Twitter

Subscription Information
(Institutional Administrator Access)

Explore:

AER - All Issues

AER - Forthcoming Articles

Virtual Field Journals


AEA Member Login:


AEAweb | AEA Journals | Contact Us