This setting lets you change the way you view articles. You can choose to have articles open in a dialog window, a new tab, or directly in the same window.
Open in Dialog
Open in New Tab
Open in same window

American Economic Journal: Applied Economics: Vol. 1 No. 3 (July 2009)

Expand

Quick Tools:

Print Article Summary
Export Citation
Sign up for Email Alerts Follow us on Twitter Subscription Information
(Institutional Administrator Access)

Explore:

AEJ: Applied - All Issues

AEJ: Applied Forthcoming Articles

Task Specialization, Immigration, and Wages

Article Citation

Peri, Giovanni, and Chad Sparber. 2009. "Task Specialization, Immigration, and Wages." American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, 1(3): 135-69.

DOI: 10.1257/app.1.3.135

Abstract

Large inflows of less educated immigrants may reduce wages paid to comparably-educated, native-born workers. However, if less educated foreign- and native-born workers specialize in different production tasks, because of different abilities, immigration will cause natives to reallocate their task supply, thereby reducing downward wage pressure. Using occupational task-intensity data from the O*NET dataset and individual US census data, we demonstrate that foreign-born workers specialize in occupations intensive in manual-physical labor skills while natives pursue jobs more intensive in communication-language tasks. This mechanism can explain why economic analyses find only modest wage consequences of immigration for less educated native-born workers. (JEL J24, J31, J61)

Article Full-Text Access

Full-text Article

Additional Materials

Download Data Set (1.69 MB) | Online Appendix (121.72 KB)

Authors

Peri, Giovanni (U CA, Davis)
Sparber, Chad (Colgate U)

JEL Classifications

J24: Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
J31: Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
J61: Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

Comments

View Comments on This Article (0) | Login to post a comment


American Economic Journal: Applied Economics


Quick Tools:

Sign up for Email Alerts

Follow us on Twitter

Subscription Information
(Institutional Administrator Access)

Explore:

AEJ: Applied - All Issues

AEJ: Applied - Forthcoming Articles

Virtual Field Journals


AEA Member Login:


AEAweb | AEA Journals | Contact Us